The flexibility of the bamboo – Sarrat

Here are some more images captured in the same place where I took the scenes in the previous post. As a child in the province (just a few years back! Hmm…) I had my ample share of riding a bamboo raft in a river at the back of my grandmother’s house whenever we visited her on weekends. I enjoyed riding sitting but the downside is you get wet-that’s fine if you intend to dive in the water after. Standing on the raft was very hard because there was nothing you can hold on to. Maintaining your balance is the key so as not to fall (and be the talk of the town the next day! Hehe!). It may be a little bit easier if the raft is not moving but if it is, like the images below, you may need an extraordinary display of balance to reach the other side in exactly the same form as you boarded.

It may be a common sight in the province to see bamboo rafts transporting people from one end of the river to the other, such as the image below, after all that is what the raft is widely known for – to transport people:

bam1.jpg

But when you see bamboo rafts transporting a motorbike aside from people, you start to wonder:

bam2.jpg

“Hold on to something more steady,

or better yet, do not get off the motorbike!”

bam3.jpg

“Yes, don’t get off the motorbike.

If you have none, hold on to each other…with attitude!”

If you don’t get enough of the motorbike, what about a “tricycle,” loaded with a sack of rice!

bam4.jpg

“Yes, yes, hold on to each other! If you’re alone,

pitty you, to get no one and nothing to hold on to!”

The previous scenes were captivating the eyes of someone who does not often see an awesome display of wit and brawn in utilizing the “bamboo raft” as a mode of transportation to transport yet another mode of transportation. I was waiting the whole day because the bamboo raft might just load a “jeepney” next, but I failed…

Postscript: The river here divides two towns. Instead of driving several kilometers on concrete road going around several more towns just to reach the other side of the river, it’s better to take the raft. It’s cheaper and shorter!

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Gallery | This entry was posted in A. ILOCOS, Biag (Life of Ilocano's), Gameng (Crafts), Ladawan (Photos), Lugan (Ilocos Transpo) and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The flexibility of the bamboo – Sarrat

  1. mateo says:

    I reside nearby this town, Sarrat, Ilocos Norte. This river, Padsan, divides the town of Sarrat at the center (well, almost!) and has isolated the Southern portion from the Northern part where the Municipal Hall is located. However, a bridge is now under construction upstream of the pictured area of this river, which would connect the South and North Sarrat. The bamboo raft could hold as much weight as the weight of the displaced water of the bamboos’ volume before going under water. That’s Physics101 for you! Come visit the River Resorts of Sarrat where you can picnic-dine with your body immersed halfway in the flowing waters…

  2. cher says:

    that was a feast fro my eyes– i had never been as excited as i am now to visit ilocos. so much beauty and creative imagination from one picture… thank you for sharing =)

  3. Constantine says:

    Kung mas mabigat ka sa tricycle, baka nga lumubog kah! Haha!

  4. grabe..naku po..pano na ko niyan..baka lumubog..hehehe

    *thanks for sharing..kakaiba ito..hmmm

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